Squash Blossom Pizza Recipe from Saveur.com

Squash Blossom Pizza

I found this interesting sounding pizza recipe in an issue of Saveur magazine. Since I absolutely loved cooking with squash blossoms, I therefore absolutely love this pizza! I’ve gone through an condensed the directions as well, making sure to get rid of all instances for silliness. If you’d like to check out the original recipe/directions, check it out at Saveur.com. This recipe, inspired by Pizzeria Mozza, yields a crisp, chewy crust. See Making and Baking the Pie for a sauce recipe and more tips for making pizza.

  • 9 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 tbsp. active dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 6 cups flour
  • 2 cups pizza sauce
  • 60 squash blossoms, stemmed
  • 1 lb. burrata (a sort-of mozzarella that must be eaten fresh)

1. In a bowl, combine 1 tbsp. oil, yeast, sugar, salt, and 2 cups 115˚ water; let sit until foamy, 10–12 minutes. Stir in flour to make a dough. Transfer dough to a floured surface; knead until smooth, 8–10 minutes. Quarter dough; roll each portion into a ball. Put balls on a floured baking sheet. Cover with plastic wrap; let sit in a warm place until soft and tripled in size, 2–3 hours. IF you’d like to have an even tastier dough, toss the dough in sealable containers, or plastic baggies, and let sit in the fridge for a day or two. When you are ready to bake, pull the dough out two hours before you want to eat to let it come back to room temperature.

2. Place a pizza stone on a rack in lower third of oven. Heat oven to as absolutely as hot as it will go for 1 hour. Stretch dough to a 10″ diameter. Cover dough with a tea towel; let rest for 15 minutes. Brush edges with 2 tbsp. oil. Season dough with salt. Spread 1⁄2 cup pizza sauce over dough, leaving a 1″ border. Arrange 15 squash blossoms over sauce in concentric circles. Transfer pizza to stone; bake until golden brown, 3-6 minutes. Remove pizza and top with spoonfuls of burrata; drizzle with olive oil. Repeat to make 4 pizzas.

MAKES FOUR 10″ PIZZAS

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Oven Dried Tomatoes – Your New Favorite

There was a great, quick little article about oven drying tomatoes in Food & Wine magazine recently, so I decided to go ahead and give it a try. The product is an awesome dried tomato that is much less tough and ‘raisiny’ than sundried tomatoes – and they make GREAT pizza toppings! They are soft and easy to bite through while remaining sweet and carmelized tasting. The best of both worlds! Try this recipe out today and you’ll agree, oven dried tomatoes are your new favorite 🙂

Update: The tomatoes made a guest appearance in a recent video.

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 pounds firm but ripe plum tomatoes, cored and halved lengthwise
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for packing
  • 2 heads of garlic, cloves separated but not peeled
  • 12 large thyme sprigs
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 325° and position 2 racks just above and just below the middle of the oven. Working over a medium bowl, pry the seeds and pulp out of the tomatoes and discard. Pour 1/4 cup of the olive oil onto each of 2 very sturdy, rimmed, light-colored baking sheets. Arrange the tomatoes cut side down on the baking sheets and scatter the garlic and thyme all around. Make a tiny slit on each tomato.
  2. Bake the tomatoes for about 45 minutes, until the skins begin to wrinkle. Shift the pans from top to bottom halfway through. Carefully pinch off the skins. Flip each tomato and bake until the surface looks dry, about 1 hour. Flip the tomatoes again and continue baking until the surfaces look dry but the tomatoes are still slightly plump, about 2 hours longer. Season the tomatoes with salt and pepper and let cool completely.
  3. Discard the thyme sprigs and peel the garlic cloves. Layer the tomatoes with the garlic in five 1/2-pint jars. Add enough olive oil to cover the tomatoes by at least 1 inch. Slide the blade of a knife along the side of each jar to release any air bubbles. Seal the jars and refrigerate for up to 2 months or freeze for up to 6 months.